Turning Turk

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One of the most striking features of the two neighbourhoods I have lived in the last two years is their large Turkish communities. In fact, I can proudly claim to have lived in the two areas that have the largest Turkish populations outside of Turkey. For those who don’t know that’s Kreuzberg, Berlin and Haringey, London. I’m unexceptional in that the most obvious way in which Turkey impinges on my urban existence is via its food. In this way I’ve been spoiled. Even though I haven’t experienced the true spectrum of authentic Turkish cuisine in my regular visits to budget Turkish eateries, I reckon I’ve got a pretty good idea when it comes to what’s good for your few Euros/Quid. I don’t usually like to give “city tips” on this blog, as the idea of writing something akin to a travel blog premised on a young Brit going to Berlin and having a good time is abhorrent to me, but I’ll briefly transgress my own standards of dignity anyway.

The best Döner in the world ever can be eaten at Hisar, Yorckstraße, Berlin.
The best Sish in the world can be eaten  at Antepliler, Harringay, London.

Back to the music… I’m usually too busy deafening myself with a regular kick drum to pay much attention to any enticing sounds that might be floating out of neighboring flats or houses, so the musical dimension to Turkish culture has tended to pass me by.  However a good friend of mine turned me on to a gloriously fresh mix the other day of psychedelic Turkish funk, which I’m hoping is going to be the starting point for some new exciting music hunting. Obviously it’s not fresh fresh as the tracks I believe have been kicking round for a good thirty or forty years, but it’s fresh in the sense that it’s very good or fly or of a high quality or something like that. Mixcloud is on the goods again for this one…

Psych Turkish Funk Pt. 1 by Karriem Diggins

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One response to “Turning Turk

  1. Harringay (the neighbourhood) is odd in that the high street (Green Lanes) has a lot of Turkish & Kurdish shops but they make up a very small part of the resident population. Less than 4% at teh last census.

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